Edible vaccines

This approach would yield vaccines that are needle-free and require no adjuvants, chemicals that stimulate the immune response. When the plant is ingested, the plant cell walls would protect the vaccine antigens from degradation by stomach acid and digestive enzymes. Then in the intestine, the antigens would be released and transported into the circulatory system. Edible vaccines would stimulate both mucosal and systemic immunity, providing a higher level of protection than traditional vaccines.

Edible vaccines

Indian J Med Microbiol. Edible vaccines hold great promise as a cost-effective, easy-to-administer, easy-to-store, fail-safe and socioculturally readily acceptable vaccine delivery system, especially for the poor developing countries.

It involves introduction of selected desired genes into plants and then inducing these altered plants to manufacture the encoded proteins.

Introduced as a concept about a decade ago, it has become a reality today. A variety of delivery systems have been developed.

Edible vaccines

Initially thought to be useful only for preventing infectious diseases, it has also found application in prevention of autoimmune diseases, birth control, cancer therapy, etc.

Edible vaccines are currently being developed for a number of human and animal diseases. There is growing acceptance of transgenic crops in both industrial and developing countries. Resistance to genetically modified foods may affect the future of edible vaccines.

Edible vaccines: current status and future.

They have passed the major hurdles in the path of an emerging vaccine technology. Various technical obstacles, regulatory and non-scientific challenges, though all seem surmountable, need to be overcome.

This review attempts to discuss the current status and future of this new preventive modality.But edible vaccines come into contact with the lining of the digestive tract.

In theory, then, they would activate both mucosal and systemic immunity. That dual effect should, in turn, help improve protection against many dangerous microorganisms, including, importantly, the kinds that cause diarrhea.

Scientific American: Edible Vaccines Although the best healthcare intervention has always been vaccination the eradication of smallpox is still remembered as one of the best healthcare achievements todaythe traditional methods of vaccination can be problematic in some areas of the world. The only available vaccines that protect against infectious diseases are either infectious agents that have been killed or pathogens that have been changed in some way to remove their ability to cause disease.
Edible vaccines: current status and future. - PubMed - NCBI Ingrid Spilde Veggies could become even better for you.
Edible Vaccines - Scientific American Print Advertisement Vaccines have accomplished near miracles in the fight against infectious disease. They have consigned smallpox to history and should soon do the same for polio.
Today's selected stories Abstract Edible vaccines hold great promise as a cost-effective, easy-to-administer, easy-to-store, fail-safe and socioculturally readily acceptable vaccine delivery system, especially for the poor developing countries. It involves introduction of selected desired genes into plants and then inducing these altered plants to manufacture the encoded proteins.
Vaccines have accomplished near miracles in the fight against infectious disease.

“In principle, all vaccines could be made edible,” says the researcher. Senior researcher Jihong Liu Clarke of Bioforsk.(Photo: Bioforsk) This can be done through manipulation of food plants such as lettuce, spinach, broccoli and potatoes to make them create the specific antigens.

Edible vaccines have also provided laboratory animals with some protection against challenge by the rabies virus, Helicobacter pylori (a bacterial cause of ulcers) and the mink enteric virus.

66 Scientific American September Edible Vaccines V accines have accomplished near miracles in the fight against infectious disease. They have consigned smallpox to history and should soon.

Edible vaccines have also provided laboratory animals with some protection against challenge by the rabies virus, Helicobacter pylori (a bacterial cause of ulcers) and the mink enteric virus. She says scientists all over the world are trying to make edible plants generate vaccines.

Clarke is involved in research to develop such a vegetable vaccine against dengue. Simply put, a vaccine works by presenting characteristic segments of a virus or other harmful substances to the body’s immune system.

Scientific American: Edible Vaccines